Colorado’s Last Frontier

One hundred years ago, large ranches and open space filled Colorado’s landscapes. The Centennial state was the land immortalized in song, with purple mountains majesty.

While Colorado is still famous for its gorgeous forests and wilderness areas, expanding ski resorts and a growing population have led to the parceling of large ranches, making the cinema-worthy lifestyle virtually obsolete.

The days of working cowboys and herds of roaming cattle may be gone in most of Colorado, but one often unheard of county maintains its ranching heritage in unique and exquisite ways.

Custer County preserves its ranching culture through conservation easements, lighting ordinances, and annual events celebrating the ranching lifestyle. The result is a pocket of Colorado that remains virtually untouched, whose beauty and outdoor opportunities rival any other in the West.

Through a partnership with VistaWorks, I was fortunate to research and write about this remarkable area. The county’s “largest” towns, Westcliffe and Silver Cliff, are lesser-known compared to behemoths like Breckenridge or Steamboat. But like much of Colorado’s smaller treasures, they’ve recently been thrust into the spotlight.

Check out my newest project, www.VisitCusterCounty.com, to learn all about this amazing, up-and-coming Colorado destination. It won’t be secret for long so be sure to visit soon!

Get Higher on www.Leadville.com

snowmobile 1Another travel website launched. Another Colorado city for which I’ve become an expert. Seriously, ask me anything about Leadville–where to bike with kids, why the Ice Palace was built, what to do when it’s too cold to play outside–and I’ll have the answer.

Still, I’m as grateful as ever to have had the opportunity to research and write about Leadville, a Colorado city that truly surprised me (thank you VistaWorks!). Though I live 30 minutes south of the country’s highest city, I had no idea everything it has to offer.

Check out www.Leadville.com if you happen to be heading that way or are just curious to know how this little city was once the center of Colorado and the mining world.